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History of perfume...

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Post on 24-4-2007 07:44 PM |All posts

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ada sesiapa tau asal usul minyak wangi tak?

[ Last edited by  chep at 25-4-2007 12:15 AM ]
ADO MALAM....?

lu Pikirlah sendiri.....
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Post on 24-4-2007 10:43 PM |All posts
camnih asal usul dia...pada zaman dulu seorg pegembara arab bwk susu,sedang dia syok berjalan,nak diminumnya susu itu..tapi susu tu jadik perfume..sekian terima kasih
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Post on 25-4-2007 12:02 AM |All posts
Originally posted by gelupur at 24-4-2007 10:43 PM
camnih asal usul dia...pada zaman dulu seorg pegembara arab bwk susu,sedang dia syok berjalan,nak diminumnya susu itu..tapi susu tu jadik perfume..sekian terima kasih

naper tak kelakar?
@bEnCi.bIrAh.kEnToT.nEnEk.MaMa.GeMuK.cAnTiK.LuBaNg.bUsOk.MeNgIrAi@
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Post on 25-4-2007 12:04 AM |All posts
ye la.. nape aku rasa tak kelakar..
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Post on 25-4-2007 12:08 AM |All posts
The History of Perfume

Perfume was first used by the Egyptians as part of their religious rituals. The two principal methods of use at this time was the burning of incense and the application of balms and ointments. Perfumed oils were applied to the skin for either cosmetic or medicinal purposes. During the Old and Middle Kingdoms, perfumes were reserved exclusively for religious rituals such as cleansing ceremonies. Then during the New Kingdom (1580-1085 BC) they were used during festivals and Egyptian women also used perfumed creams and oils as toiletries and cosmetics and as preludes to love-making. The use of perfume then spread to Greece, Rome, and the Islamic world. And it was the Islamic community that kept the use of perfumes since the spread of Christianity led to a decline in the use of perfume. With the fall of the Roman Empire, perfume's influence dwindled. It was not until the twelfth century and the development of international trade that this decline was reversed.

Perfume enjoyed huge success during the seventeenth century. Perfumed gloves became popular in France and in 1656, the guild of glove and perfume-makers was established. The use of perfume in France grew steadily. The court of Louis XV was even named "the perfumed court" due to the scents which were applied daily not only to the skin but also to clothing, fans and furniture. The eighteenth century saw a revolutionary advance in perfumery with the invention of eau de Cologne. This refreshing blend of rosemary, neroli, bergamot and lemon was used in a multitude of different ways: diluted in bath water, mixed with wine, eaten on a sugar lump, as a mouthwash, an enema or an ingredient for a poultice, injected directly... and so on. The variety of eighteenth-century perfume containers was as wide as that of the fragrances and their uses. Sponges soaked in scented vinaigres de toilette were kept in gilded metal vinaigrettes. Liquid perfumes came in beautiful Louis XIV-style pear-shaped bottles. Glass became increasingly popular, particularly in France with the opening of the Baccarat factory in 1765.

As with industry and the arts, perfume was to undergo profound change in the nineteenth century. Changing tastes and the development of modern chemistry laid the foundations of perfumery as we know it today. Alchemy gave way to chemistry and new fragrances were created. The French Revolution had in no way diminished the taste for perfume, there was even a fragrance called "Parfum a la Guillotine." Under the post-revolutionary government, people once again dared to express a penchant for luxury goods, including perfume. A profusion of vanity boxes containing perfumes appeared in the 19th century.
Due to its jasmine, rose and orange-growing trades, the town of Grasse in Provence established itself as the largest production center for raw materials. The statutes of the perfume-makers of Grasse were passed in 1724. Paris became the commercial counterpart to Grasse and the world center of perfume. Perfume houses such as Houbigant (Quelques Fleurs, still very popular today), Lubin, Roger & Gallet, and Guerlain were all based in Paris. In 1760, in London, James Henry Creed founded the House of Creed perfume.

With the turn of the century fragrance houses emerged in Europe. The Crown Perfumery was founded in 1872 by William Sparks Thomson, a maker of crinolines and corsets. Catering to the high society in London and Europe, he launched a collection of floral fragrances called Flower Fairies. Queen Victoria granted the Crown Perfumery her own crown's image to top the fragrance bottles. In 2002 Clive Christian discontinued the Crown line of fragrances.

Soon bottling became more important. Perfume maker Francois Coty formed a partnership with Rene Lalique. Lalique then produced bottles for Guerlain perfume, D'Orsay, Lubin, Molinard, Roger & Gallet and others. Baccarat then joined in, producing the bottle for Mitsouko (Guerlain), Shalimar (Guerlain) and others. Brosse glassworks created the memorable bottle for Jeanne Lanvin's Arpege perfume, the famous Chanel No.5, and most recently for Parfums Raffy single note fragrances.

In 1921- Couturier Gabrielle Chanel launched her own brand of perfume, created by Ernest Beaux, she calls it Chanel No.5 because it was the fifth in a line of fragrances Ernest Beaux presented her. Ernest Beaux was the first perfumer to use aldehydes regularly in perfumery.

The 1930's saw the arrival of the leather fragrances, and florals, also became quite popular with the emergence of Worth's Je Reviens (1932), Caron's Fleurs de Rocaille (1933) and Jean Patou's Joy perfume (1935). With French perfumery at it's peak in the 1950's, other designers such as Christian Dior, Jacques Fath, Nina Ricci perfume, Pierre Balmain and so on, started creating their own scents.

The recent popularity of celebrity fragrances has also made an impact on the industry although most experts do not expect the trend to last. Today there are over 30,000 designer perfumes on the market and perfumes are no longer for the wealthy. The perfume industry has undergone several changes in technique, material and style. All of which have created the modern fragrance industry, one that still incorporates creativity,  mystique and romance along with marketing to appeal to the masses

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________


rujukan: http://inventors.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.parfumsraffy.com/history.html


[ Last edited by  chep at 25-4-2007 12:14 AM ]
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Post on 25-4-2007 11:20 AM |All posts

Reply #2 gelupur's post

secara jujurnya aku tergelak bila 1st time baca post dia ni..
..dan sebenarnya...
..Dark Knight...
..ryan giggs...
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Post on 25-4-2007 12:55 PM |All posts
aku sendiri pun gelak gak...
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lu Pikirlah sendiri.....
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Post on 25-4-2007 02:11 PM |All posts
Originally posted by chep at 25-4-2007 12:08 AM
The History of Perfume

Perfume was first used by the Egyptians as part of their religious rituals. The two principal methods of use at this time was the burning of incense and the application  ...








[ Last edited by  sephia_liza at 25-4-2007 02:23 PM ]
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Post on 25-4-2007 02:13 PM |All posts

Early European bottles



Early 1800 & 1900's
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Post on 25-4-2007 02:16 PM |All posts

1920's




1930's
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Post on 25-4-2007 02:18 PM |All posts

1940's

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Post on 25-4-2007 02:30 PM |All posts
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Post on 25-4-2007 03:19 PM |All posts
mcm mana avatar sphia_liza dibenarkan haaa???l
..dan sebenarnya...
..Dark Knight...
..ryan giggs...
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Post on 25-4-2007 04:03 PM |All posts
Originally posted by cak! at 25-4-2007 03:19 PM
mcm mana avatar sphia_liza dibenarkan haaa???l


teruk sangat ke.....sorry le..sorry....aku cuba tukar yg lain ok...
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Post on 25-4-2007 04:04 PM |All posts

Reply #12 sephia_liza's post

aku lebih tertarik ngan avatar cik sephia ni....
hidup ini penuh bermakna....zulnisza.........
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Post on 25-4-2007 04:13 PM |All posts
Originally posted by piot at 25-4-2007 04:04 PM
aku lebih tertarik ngan avatar cik sephia ni....


teruk sangat ke.....sorry......aku cuba tukar ok...
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Post on 27-4-2007 12:36 PM |All posts
ala liza..aku tak dan tengok ko dah tukar.....tarok balik la yg lama...
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Post on 28-4-2007 04:44 PM |All posts
Originally posted by koko2 at 27-4-2007 12:36 PM
ala liza..aku tak dan tengok ko dah tukar.....tarok balik la yg lama...


giler aper nak tarok balik...dah le aku kena sound dgn mod.... .....diaorg nak delete post aku kalu aku berdegil x tukar avatar tu..... ....rugi le aku.....so..aku ikut le ckp diaorg...nk buat cam mana....
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Post on 29-4-2007 03:42 PM |All posts
tq krn sudi kongsi info..
ADO MALAM....?

lu Pikirlah sendiri.....
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Post on 29-4-2007 05:57 PM |All posts

Reply #5 chep's post

Menarik fakta ni
Seluruh hidupku hanya untukMu Tuhan sekelian alam
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paradigm shift

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Post on 30-4-2007 03:03 PM |All posts
Perfume is thousands of years old - the word "perfume" comes from the Latin per fume "through smoke". One of the oldest uses of perfumes comes form the burning of incense and aromatic herbs used in religious services, often the aromatic gums, frankincense and myrrh, gathered from trees. The Egyptians were the first to incorporate perfume into their culture followed by the ancient Chinese, Hindus, Israelites, Carthaginians, Arabs, Greeks, and Romans. The earliest use of perfume bottles is Egyptian and dates to around 1000 BC. The Egyptians invented glass and perfume bottles were one of the first common uses for glass.
My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we'll change the world.
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Post on 30-4-2007 03:04 PM |All posts
Perfumery in Western Europe around the 13th century
Background details
The use of native aromatic herbs and flowers to sweeten the air had been known for a very long time. The Romans had introduced many species of aromatic plants to the fringes of the Empire where they were still cultivated. It was common for people to wear a garland of flowers, to hang fragrant plants indoors and the add aromatic plants to sweet-smelling rushes when they were spread on a floor (this last probably started as a Norman custom).

In the making of perfumed preparations, plants were usually used as dried flowers, dried leaves, dried and crushed roots, or extracts in water (by maceration or digestion), oils or fats (and later alcohol). An association between pleasant smells and good health was very widespread so there was considerable overlap between perfumery and healing.

From the 9th century, there was great trade between Byzantium and Venice bringing perfumes into Europe. There was much trade within Arabia, bringing perfumes from Baghdad to Muslim Spain. Arabian perfume arts were very highly developed; having learnt much from the Persians, they used ingredients from China, India and Africa, producing perfumes on a large scale. They had been using distillation since before the 9th century. Al-Hawi, a book by Rhazes, who lived in the late 9th or early 10th century, contained a chapter on cosmetics. It was translated into Latin in France in the late 12th century.

Musk and floral perfumes were brought to northwest Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries from Arabia, through trade with the Islamic world and with the returning Crusaders. Those who traded for these were most often also involved in trade for spices and dyestuffs. There are records of the Pepperers Guild of London which go back to 1179; their activities include trade in spices, perfume ingredients and dyes. There are records from the reign of Edward I to show that spices and other aromatic exotic materials were traded in England.

Use of alcohol in perfumery was known in northwest Europe in the 12th century but was not widespread until later. A variant of distilled alcohol, rather than alcohol mixed with water, was known in France in the 13th century, prepared by using quicklime in the mix to remove much of the water. Alcohol-based perfume was well known in parts of mainland Europe and came into use in England in the 14th century.

A common technique was to extract essential oil into fat and use it like that or then to remove the esential oil from the fat with alcohol. Another was to heat the plant material in water. Beeswax was used as a base instead of fats and oils sometimes. Pot Pourri was originally made and used wet; it started as the residue of the perfume-making process.

Plants likely to have been available for collection or cultivation
Scented Agrimony perennial herb; dried flowers and leaves
Angelica biennial herb; reputed to be effective against evil spirits and infectious disease; fragrant oil extracted from the seeds and root for use in perfumery; seed and root used dry in pot pourri
Apple   
Avens dried rhizomes and leaves
Birch essential oil from leaf buds
Blackcurrant essential oil from flower buds
Broom flowers used
Calamint several species used dried or as essential oil
Camomile used as a herbal medicine, for strewing, as dried flowers or oil extracted from flowers
Clover dried flowers used
Cyperus (Sedge roots) rhizomes yield a violet-like fragrance; used dried and powdered
Elder flower used as oil extracted from flowers, or dried flowers
Fennel essential oil from seeds; also has culinary and medical uses; reputed to ward off evil spirits and witches
Fern (Common Male Fern) oil extracted from rhizomes had medical and perfumes uses
Feverfew perennial plant; extract from flowers and leaves used in medicine and, less frequently, in perfume
Hawthorn flowers used
Hyssop extracted oil or dried leaves
Lavender extracts and dried flowers and leaves
Lemon balm oil from leaves and dried leaves
Lily of the Valley flowers
Melilot dried flowers and leaves
Milfoil (Yarrow) dried flowers; diabolical associations
Mint medical, culinary, strewing and perfume use
Oak moss (lichen) powdered, used as a fixative
Orris (Iris rhizome) dried iris rhizomes; fixative with violet fragrance
Rose extracts from petals and fresh or dried petals
Rosemary strewing herb; dried leaves
Rue oil from leaves; medical and perfume use; reputed to guard against witches
Sage dried leaves
Tansy strewing herb; dried leaves
Violet oil from flowers

Ingredients possibly available by trading
Aloewood Introduced into Europe by Arabs in 8th century and spread rapidly. Aromatic heartwood from an evergreen tree obtained by the Arabs from China, Assam, Malaysia which produces a fragrant oil when disea sed.
Important ingredient of pomanders (as oil) and pot pourri (dried)
Alpine rose Oil obtained from the roots
Ambergris Sperm whale excretion ('though this origin was unknown for a very long time) found on the Indian Ocean coast
Used since early Arabian times (6th century)
Ammoniacum Juice from a North African plant. Used as incense.
Anise Cultivated through Europe and in England during Middle Ages; medical and culinary use; dried seeds and oil extracted from them used in perfumery.
Apricot kernels oil extract frequently used in early Arabian perfumes.
Basil culinary and oerume use; essential oil and dried leaves
Ben Oil from seeds of the Moringa tree native to North India frequently used as a base in early Arabian perfumes
Bitter almond essential oil from the fruit used as a base
Camphor crystals formed from oil extracted from wood; very frequently used in early Arabian perfumes
Caraway oil extracted from fruit and leaves; culinary and perfume use
Cassia culinary use of dried buds; oil used in perfume; dried bark used. N.B. there is some confusion in old texts between cassia, cinnamon and other unidentified fragrant barks
Cedar wood dried twigs and roots used in incense; oil extract used in perfume
Cinnamon dried bark used as perfumed beads and in pomanders; oil from leaves used in perfume and unguents. N.B. there is some confusion in old texts between cassia, cinnamon and other unidentified fragrant barks
Civet glandular secretion from civet cat from Africa, used in very small quantities; became popular in Arabia in the 10th century
Clary sage fragrant oil and dried leaves ; also used for eye problems
Cumin oil from dried seeds; also had medical and culinary uses
Dill oil extracted from plant; culinary, medical and perfume use; reputed to be good against witchcraft
Frankincense gum resin extruded from wood of certain trees; often used in incense
Gum arabic gum extruded by Acacia trees; dried and used in incense; used in early Arabian perfumes
Jasmine leaves, flowers and oils; commonly used in early Arabian perfumes
Labdanum resin secreted by Cistus (Rock Rose) species. According to reports, popularly collected by combing it from the beards of goats; used in early Arabian perfumes and in European pomanders
Lovage dried leaves and roots
Marjoram oil from seeds and leaves and dried leaves; medical, culinary and perfumes uses
Mignonette (Reseda) essential oil from flowers
Musk glandular secretion from musk deer; very frequently used in early Arabian perfumes
Myrrh (includes Opoponax) gum resin from trees; used in perfumes and incense
Myrtle oil or dried flowers and leaves; used as berries and fresh leaves in early Arabian perfumes
Rosewater (also Attar of Roses) made by a distillation process from rose petals in water. Attar (essential oil) obtained by redistillation of rosewater. Very popular in Arabia
Saffron dried stigmas of crocus and oil from these; culinary and perfume use; very important in Arabian perfumery
Sandalwood oil from the heartwood of a tree; fragrance and fixative
Savory dried leaves and flowers; culinary and perfume uses
Storax (resin) resin from bark used in incense and pomanders
Sweet orange essential oil from the fruit peel; peel also used dried
Terebinth oil and gum resin; used in pomanders
Thyme oil from leaves; leaves used in incense
Valerian oil, leaves and roots; medical, culinary and perfume use

References
The Perfume Handbook
Nigel Groom
Chapman & Hall; London SE1 8HN; 1992. ISBN 0 412 46320 2
Includes an A-Z of perfume plus recipes

History of Perfume
Frances Kennett
George G Harrap & Co; London WC1V 7AX; 1975. ISBN 0 245 52135 6
My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we'll change the world.
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Post on 30-4-2007 05:27 PM |All posts
wow...

ada sesiape dah tengok movie perfume tak...?
ADO MALAM....?

lu Pikirlah sendiri.....
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Post on 1-5-2007 12:26 AM |All posts
tak kisah asal dari mana asal halal n sedap dibau.....
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Post on 9-5-2007 12:36 PM |All posts

History of Perfume Bottles and Perfumery

Prehistory



It has been repeated often that the history of perfumery is as old as the history of the humanity. We find literary or archaeological witnesses in the oldest civilizations, in the most remote cultures, that they tell to us about the aromas, the ointments and the perfumes. From the Mesopotamian cultures to nowadays, the men and in particular the women have had an inclination or weakness, not to say a necessity, to perfume themselves and to embellish themselves. But the first question is when and how was the first perfume born? When and where had the custom to perfume begun?

The scents, like the colours or the noises, already they existed in the nature at the moment at which the man appears on the Earth. The brackish scent of the sea or the one of the Earth wet after raining and so many others. But there is a little while in which the man discovers a new aroma, different from all those to which was customary and he could dominate, because the power to obtain it and to originate it was in his hands. When was this moment? And which was this perfume?

I like to think that everything was originated back in prehistory, a day in which one of those primitive men, who got dressed in animal skins, hunted with axes or stone arrows and they almost spoke and they understood with monosyllables, they ignited a bonfire to warm up themselves or to move away the fierce animals that could watch to them and they ignited, by pure chance, branches or resins of a tree that gave off a pleasant scent, an unpublished scent, that never before they had felt.

They, being surprised and disturbed, would run to call to the other components of the group or of the tribe so they could smell the smoke of that bonfire that gave off a so fragrant and scent aroma. Perhaps that the fact to find it so pleasant and that the smoke rose directly towards the sky, it made think to them about using it like offering to the divinities or to the supernatural forces that inhabited it and that from above they governed their fragile Earth destinies there.

The certain thing is that all the old civilizations used the perfume obtained by means of the smoke of the incense, myrrh, or of other resins and woods to offer it to their Gods and that, nowadays, still are many, the Eastern and western religions that in their liturgy use the penetrating scent of the incense or the small sticks of sandal and other aromatic woods.
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