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Selain nusantara, di mana lagi ada orang Melayu?

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Author: bridex       Show all posts   Read mode

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Post time 7-7-2011 09:23 PM | Show all posts |Read mode
beberapa thn lps, aku ada tgk kat tv, krew rtm klu x silap aku, ada pegi kat 1 pulau ni, bukan kat Asia, aku x ingat kat mana. aku keliru antara Mauritius, Mediteranean atau Madagascar. seingat aku org2 kat pulau ni ckp melayu style accent indon tp x pekat sangat.


aku try google ngn keyword 'malay in mauritius/mediteranean/madagascar. tp x jmp apa2 pon (atau aku yg tgk lebih kurang)

infact aku just jmp ni.

The Malays

       
Among the major ethnolinguistic groups in the world, the nusantarian family (also called "Malayo-Polynesian" or "Austronesian" by western authors) undeniably occupied the largest geographical territory prior the modern era. From east to west, this vast territory covered the area from Rapa-nui (Easter Island) to Madagascar, approximately 60% the circumference of the earth. From north to south, it included the island of Taiwan (Pekan, for the Nusantarian natives), the archipelago of Hawaii (from "Hava-iki" or "Little Java", to recollect the ancestral homeland of the Polynesian), and New Zealand (Aotearoa in Maori language).

Beyond this heartland, other regions were frequented by Nusantarians navigators, including the major part of the Pacific Ocean (to South America) and the Indonesian Ocean, as far as East Africa. [1]

The Indonesian voyaged the wide Pacific from Africa to Easter Island, from China to the coral seas of the south. The wanderings of these early Malays were remarkable achievements of navigation. They brought the sail into the Pacific nineteen centuries ago. The reading of the stars was known to them, as was the making of charts. That these voyages took place at an early date is suggested by the fact that as early as BC 2300 the Chinese had charted the heavens to pave the way for the navigator.

The Arabic "Book of Miracles" describes a voyage of three hundred ships made to Madagascar in 945. It is possible that the African coast was reached at this early date.

In all likelihood, the island was discovered in the first centuries of the common era by seafarers from central Indonesia, related to the ancestors of the present people of Southeast Kalimantan.[7] One wonders what drove them so far to the west. In the current state of knowledge, there is obviously no answer to that question. However, it is likely that those people were not the only Nusantarians who frequented the western part of the Indonesian Ocean during that era.

In fact, the Melayu traders (namely, the Melayu speaking Nusantarians kingdoms, the most prominent being one named "Funan" by Chinese authors) traded between the Sea of China and the coastal countries of the Indonesian Ocean, as far as the Roman empire, to the northwest.[8]

And probably, presence of Melayu in that region might have contributed to the process of hinduization of Southeast Asia. While the Merina's ancestors slowly undertook the exploration and colonization of Madagascar, others Nusantarians traded actively with the African coasts and the Middle East. The items traded were mostly spices, ivory, cowries, pearls, hides, slaves, and perhaps silk. It is highly probable (as referenced in some Arabic texts) that Melayu trading posts were established on the coasts of Africa.[9].

Mauritius was visited, but not settled, by early Malay mariners



di dapati dari http://www.mauritiusencyclopedia.com/History/Malays.htm

sapa ada info leh kongsi?

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Post time 7-7-2011 10:03 PM | Show all posts
org Melayu ada kat mana2...afrika selatan, vietnam....
pulau krismas dan pulau cocos pun ada gak kalu tak silap... cuba gugel tgk...
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 Author| Post time 7-7-2011 10:06 PM | Show all posts
thx, aku akan google nnt.

aku cuma nak tau camana cara hidop org melayu selain nusantara ni. tp bukan yg berhijrah dari sini..
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Post time 7-7-2011 11:51 PM | Show all posts
pulau krismas nie dalam negara australia, dieorang cakap dalam bahasa melayu dialek terengganu.....penah tengok kat majalah 3
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 Author| Post time 7-7-2011 11:52 PM | Show all posts
crismas island ni la yg byk ketam tu kan? org melayu kat luar tu kepercayaan diorg adakah sama mcm kat sini?
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Post time 8-7-2011 12:03 AM | Show all posts
Apa yang adik jumpa dari Pak Cik Google kita...;)
Pearl divers

Muslims were crucial to the development of the pearlshelling industry along Australia's northern coast. In the late 19th century, so-called 'Malays' from South-East Asia were brought to Australia to work as indentured labourers in the shell-rich waters around Thursday Island, Darwin and Broome. Employed as divers, cooks, pump hands, and crewmen, Malays provided shellers with a source of cheap labour. The work was dangerous, and exploitation was common.


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Post time 8-7-2011 12:06 AM | Show all posts
By the turn of the century, Broome was the world's major pearlshelling centre. It was home to a varied and sometimes explosive mix of cultures, that included Malays as well as Japanese, Chinese, 'Koepangers' (usually from Timor) and Aboriginal people. Living conditions were basic, but in the 1930s the town's Muslims established a small mosque.




Letter from the Premier of Western Australia to the Acting Prime Minister asking for a naval gunboat to visit Broome to help dispel 'racial feeling', 23 June 1919

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Post time 8-7-2011 12:11 AM | Show all posts

With the implementation of the White Australia Policy, non-European indentured labourers were excluded from most industries. But the shellers successfully lobbied for an exemption on economic and racial grounds. A Royal Commission agreed in 1916 that white workers were unsuited to the physical demands of pearlshelling. Malays continued to be employed in the industry until the 1970s.


Discussion of 'The reasons why European labour has not been hitherto more generally employed' from the Report and Recommendations of the Royal Commission into the Pearl-Shelling Industry, 1916

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Post time 8-7-2011 12:15 AM | Show all posts










Bond form used by pearlshellers wishing to introduce Malay workers to Australia, c. 1903
In the postwar years, Malays were at the centre of controversies that highlighted difficulties in both the White Australia Policy and the indentured labour system. In 1947, the Chifley government attempted to deport a group of Malay seamen who had been admitted during the war as refugees. The plight of these men, many of whom had married Australian women, won considerable public sympathy.







Letter from Bishop CV Pilcher to the Sydney Morning Herald, 6 February 1948

A number of Australians were concerned that the deportation of the Malay seamen would break up the families they had established with Australian women.

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Post time 8-7-2011 12:23 AM | Show all posts
Cocos and Christmas Islanders

The Australian-administered territories of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands and Christmas Island are home to several hundred Malays. The Cocos-Malays are descended from workers brought to the Cocos Islands in the 19th century to harvest copha. They are Muslim, and have maintained much of their own culture and traditions. Australia took control of the islands in 1955


P/S : A sheepskin currency note issued in the Cocos Keeling Islands between 1887 and 1888








Boy, Cocos Keeling Islands, 1902

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Post time 8-7-2011 12:32 AM | Show all posts




P/S : Cocos (Keeling) Islanders photographed during a visit to the islands by Senator Reg Withers in 1976

Chinese and Malay indentured labourers were introduced to Christmas Island when British interests undertook phosphate mining there in the 1890s. The industry expanded significantly in the 1950s, attracting many workers from the Cocos Islands. Christmas Island became an Australian territory in 1958, but indentured labour arrangements continued until the 1970s.






P/S: School students photographed during Senator Reg Withers' visit to the Cocos (Keeling) and Christmas Islands in 1976



In recent decades, the Muslim population of Western Australia has been boosted by arrivals from the two territories. By 1981, there were more Cocos Islanders on mainland Australia than in the islands themselves. Communities in Port Hedland and Katanning have built their own mosques. In Katanning, Malay participation in the halal meat industry has increased the town's economic prosperity.




P/S : Malay Mosque, Christmas Island, 15 November 1938

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 Author| Post time 8-7-2011 12:32 AM | Show all posts
waaa.. budak tu nmpk muka melayunye.. thx 7teen.. kira diorg ni warganegara australia kan?
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Post time 8-7-2011 12:37 AM | Show all posts
Reply 5# bridex

Harap2 apa yang adik tepekkan tue dapat membantu...Tue pun sekadar tanya pak cik google..
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Post time 8-7-2011 12:39 AM | Show all posts
waaa.. budak tu nmpk muka melayunye.. thx 7teen.. kira diorg ni warganegara australia kan?
bridex Post at 8-7-2011 00:32


Aah..Sangat nampak muka melayunya..
Sama-sama kasih...
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 Author| Post time 8-7-2011 12:42 AM | Show all posts
Reply 13# 7teen
ok la tuh.. ada gak hasil.. thx.. sok nak cari lg pasal yg mauritius/mediteranean tuh. mana 1 nth. penah tgk kat tv, diorg pon ada dewan mcm kat sini, ala2 dewan kat kampung.. ye ke adik nih? hoho
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Post time 8-7-2011 12:45 AM | Show all posts
The pearl diver

Samsudin bin Katib



P/S hoto of Samsudin bin Katib, supplied with his application for naturalisation, 1947

On 3 November 1948, the MV Charon set sail from Broome bound for Singapore and Indonesia. On board was an unwilling passenger, the Sumatran-born pearl diver Samsudin bin Katib. Officially, Samsudin was being deported because he could no longer find employment in the pearling industry and was therefore in breach of his indenture agreement. However, underlying his deportation was a complex story of vested interests within the lucrative pearl shell industry.


P/S: Memorandum from RW Gratwick, Acting Commonwealth Migration Officer for Western Australia, to the Secretary, Department of Immigration, 5 November 1948




Pearl shell harvesting in Australia's northern waters was brought to a halt by the war. By 1945, with the shell fetching around 500 pounds a ton, the pearl shellers knew that their banked-up supplies would fetch a handsome profit. However, they also recognised that, now the war was over, Dutch and US vessels would be moving into Indian Ocean waters, competing for the precious resource. The shellers argued that to re-establish the industry on a competitive basis, it was necessary to reintroduce the indentured labour system. Under this system, Malay and Indonesian workers were brought to Australia on bonds to work in the pearl shelling industry. Once they were no longer required, they were expected to be returned to their country of origin.

The indentured labour system had continued after Federation as an uncomfortable exemption to the White Australia Policy. In 1946, the Chifley government sought to phase out cheap coloured labour and to re-establish the industry using white workers. However, knowing that it would take time to recruit and train suitable workers, the government bowed to pressure from the shellers to allow an extension of the indentured labour system for a further five years. It was effectively business as usual for the pearl shellers, who for the time being could continue to exploit this convenient source of cheap labour.
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Post time 8-7-2011 12:50 AM | Show all posts
A war hero





P/S hoto of Samsudin bin Katib attached to his war service record, 1942


Samsudin bin Katib was born in Padang in Sumatra on 15 July 1918. He was 18 years old when arrived in Australia aboard the Centaur on 10 June 1937. Disembarking at Broome, the young man worked as a pearl diver until 1942, when wartime Japanese attacks forced the town's evacuation.
In Perth, Samsudin joined the Australian militia and served in a variety of labour and employment companies, including working at the fish markets with the Water Transport Company. The only blemish on his service record came at this time, when he was fined 40 shillings for disobeying the lawful command of a superior officer. Military authorities eventually recognised that his skills and abilities fitted him for more challenging duties, and in December 1943 he was transferred to join the commandos in the 'Z' Special Unit.
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Post time 8-7-2011 03:28 AM | Show all posts
kat capetown, sri lanka, surinam, madagaskar. Bahasa nusantara dorang dah tak kuat. Orang2 tua ajer yang tahu cakap itu pun dah tinggal sikit.

Sultan dari mana tah, Selangor ker Perak pernah kena buang negeri kat Madagascar.
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Post time 8-7-2011 10:15 AM | Show all posts
kat selatan afrika mmg ade keturunan melayu kat sane tapi dah campur ngn negro
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 Author| Post time 8-7-2011 11:08 AM | Show all posts
keturunan melayu kat afrika tu mmg origin sana org migrate dari sini? tu yg nak tau tu
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